bluhbluhkiryu:

roswell73:

amroyounes:

My part I of a two part series on Pope Francis and why I think he rocks!  There has been a backlash against religiosity lately with all that is going on in the world and folks like him definitely help restore your faith!

I’m agnostic bordering on atheist and this man warms my heart. He is what we should all strive to be.

I’m not religious, but I love this guy!

Reblogged from
ausonia:

The Gulf Of Alaska, where two oceans meet but do not mix.

ausonia:

The Gulf Of Alaska, where two oceans meet but do not mix.

Reblogged from Ausonia
ausonia:

This 550 year old Japanese white pine, titled “Third Shogun”, is believed to be the oldest living bonsai tree in the world.

ausonia:

This 550 year old Japanese white pine, titled “Third Shogun”, is believed to be the oldest living bonsai tree in the world.

Reblogged from Ausonia
protowilson:

licklucifer:

tamorapierce:

pyrrhiccomedy:

rebelgoatalliance:

did-you-kno:

Source

Of course it’s Australian.

You always see list of deadliest toxins, but almost never lists of least fun toxins. I mean, a bite from a taipan snake will kill you dead, but in a brisk and orderly fashion that will unfold from “Ow, bugger, what was that” to “x_x” in about an hour.
The reaction to the gympie gympie stinging tree, however, can last for months, during which time there is precious little they can do for you except pump you full of steroids and strap you down to a table with a brace in your mouth so you don’t do yourself serious injury. In the 1960s, British military scientists studied the tree for its potential as a biological weapon.
The research was apparently abandoned, for reasons which have never been released to the public; but if I had to take a guess, I’d look to the example of civilian research scientist Marina Hurley, who spent three years studying the gympie gympie, and was forced to abandon her research when, despite using every manner of precaution, her exposure to the plant’s neurotoxin nevertheless led to hospitalization. The hairs on the plant which carry the toxin, you see, are regularly shed, and become airborne, at which point they can be inhaled and cause severe nosebleeds, asphyxiation, and anaphylactic shock.
One survivor of a brush with a gympie gympie described the stinging persisting for over two years, made worse whenever he took a cold shower.
Sources: 1 2 3

protowilson:

licklucifer:

tamorapierce:

pyrrhiccomedy:

rebelgoatalliance:

did-you-kno:

Source

Of course it’s Australian.

You always see list of deadliest toxins, but almost never lists of least fun toxins. I mean, a bite from a taipan snake will kill you dead, but in a brisk and orderly fashion that will unfold from “Ow, bugger, what was that” to “x_x” in about an hour.

The reaction to the gympie gympie stinging tree, however, can last for months, during which time there is precious little they can do for you except pump you full of steroids and strap you down to a table with a brace in your mouth so you don’t do yourself serious injury. In the 1960s, British military scientists studied the tree for its potential as a biological weapon.

The research was apparently abandoned, for reasons which have never been released to the public; but if I had to take a guess, I’d look to the example of civilian research scientist Marina Hurley, who spent three years studying the gympie gympie, and was forced to abandon her research when, despite using every manner of precaution, her exposure to the plant’s neurotoxin nevertheless led to hospitalization. The hairs on the plant which carry the toxin, you see, are regularly shed, and become airborne, at which point they can be inhaled and cause severe nosebleeds, asphyxiation, and anaphylactic shock.

One survivor of a brush with a gympie gympie described the stinging persisting for over two years, made worse whenever he took a cold shower.

Sources: 1 2 3

Reblogged from SMILES ALL AROUND
bluepueblo:

Emerald Lake, Canada
photo via canada

bluepueblo:

Emerald Lake, Canada

photo via canada

Reblogged from Blue Pueblo

thebricklanegallery:

Helena Hauss grew up in the heart of Paris. Having always had an artistic personality, Hauss had a tendency to live in her imagination, and this is where she discovered her unique way of communicating her thoughts; with a bic pen. Hauss spent most of her days working on new ways of using this unlikely weapon of choice. Through constant use and practice, we can see a tender relationship between Hauss and her materials with surprising results.

Helena Hauss is currently showing in our WORKS ON PAPER exhibition at the Brick Lane Gallery until 16th March 2014. The WORKS ON PAPER exhibition programme is open to all artists from all over the world. To take part in any future exhibitions please contact info@thebricklanegallery.com

Reblogged from
Tags: so talented

blame-my-muses:

leslieseuffert:

Numen/ For Use For Use used thick transparent sticky tape to create an interactive installation. By stretching, sticking and wrapping thick layers of tape around grounded pillars, beams, trees or whatever standing objects exist in the chosen space Numen/ For Use create a web of tendon tunnels and spaces that can be accessed and crawled through, strong enough to carry human weight. From afar the installation appears like an interwoven structure of bending elastic pipes.

i thought this was spiderweb and i was HORRIFIED

Reblogged from [a]void
thisisnojay:

through the window of my subconscious

thisisnojay:

through the window of my subconscious

Reblogged from no jay
Reblogged from ...
Before my birthday meal!

Before my birthday meal!